Things I've picked up along the way...

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another illumination of the presentation in the temple, but this time executed in grisaille with gold leaf highlights. It is a really good example of the grisaille technique, using a very limited palette of grey to great effect. The manuscript was produced in the late fifteenth century in Flanders, but now lives in the Walters Museum, Baltimore.
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 194. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another illumination of the presentation in the temple, but this time executed in grisaille with gold leaf highlights. It is a really good example of the grisaille technique, using a very limited palette of grey to great effect. The manuscript was produced in the late fifteenth century in Flanders, but now lives in the Walters Museum, Baltimore.

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 194. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts the presentation in the temple. Yesterday was Candlemas, the feast day celebrating this event. Sorry I’m a bit late posting, I mixed up the days!
It is an image from a lovely early fourteenth century manuscript in the collections of the Walters Museum. Their Flickr account gives the following description:

This small but richly illuminated Book of Hours was made ca. 1300-10 for the Use of Liège. The manuscript was created for a woman, likely a Beguine living in Huy, and inscriptions indicate it continued to be used in that region by another family into the seventeenth century. The number and variety of illuminations in the manuscript are remarkably given its small size, for it contains fourteen extant full-page miniatures, twenty-four calendar images, eleven extant large historiated initials, 188 small historiated initials, and countless marginal drolleries. Although an early rebinding resulted in the loss or rearrangement of several folios, this manuscript remains a fine example of the richness and intimacy of a Book of Hours from this period.

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 37. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts the presentation in the temple. Yesterday was Candlemas, the feast day celebrating this event. Sorry I’m a bit late posting, I mixed up the days!

It is an image from a lovely early fourteenth century manuscript in the collections of the Walters Museum. Their Flickr account gives the following description:

This small but richly illuminated Book of Hours was made ca. 1300-10 for the Use of Liège. The manuscript was created for a woman, likely a Beguine living in Huy, and inscriptions indicate it continued to be used in that region by another family into the seventeenth century. The number and variety of illuminations in the manuscript are remarkably given its small size, for it contains fourteen extant full-page miniatures, twenty-four calendar images, eleven extant large historiated initials, 188 small historiated initials, and countless marginal drolleries. Although an early rebinding resulted in the loss or rearrangement of several folios, this manuscript remains a fine example of the richness and intimacy of a Book of Hours from this period.

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 37. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a leaf of the ‘Masters of the Dark Eyes missal’ from the Walters Museum in Baltimore. This page shows the presentation in the temple, with all the action condensed into one tiny historiated initial.
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 175. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a leaf of the ‘Masters of the Dark Eyes missal’ from the Walters Museum in Baltimore. This page shows the presentation in the temple, with all the action condensed into one tiny historiated initial.

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 175. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

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thegetty:

A woman is brought to Christ after she is caught in the act of committing adultery. The people ask if she should be stoned, and Christ stoops to the ground and writes a message in the sand.

"He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her."

As Christ points to the feet of the characters in the painting, he also points to the feet of the viewer standing before the work of art. The artist mimics the action in the painting for viewers in his time. Reflect on your judgments, recollect your own transgressions.

Christ and the Adulteress, 1620s, Valentin de Boulogne. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Beautiful.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts the adoration of the magi - an appropriate image for today, the Christian feast day of Epiphany.
Today is also twelfth night, and the day Christmas decorations are traditionally put away until next year.
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 167, ‘the Amherst hours’. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts the adoration of the magi - an appropriate image for today, the Christian feast day of Epiphany.

Today is also twelfth night, and the day Christmas decorations are traditionally put away until next year.

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 167, ‘the Amherst hours’. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a lovely illumination of the nativity squished into an initial D. I love how tiny and angular the infant Christ child is!
Image source: Genève, Bibliothèque de Genève, Ms. lat. 30b, p. 13r – The Missal of Urbain Bonivard, Prior of Saint Victor in Geneva. Creative commons licensed by eCodices via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a lovely illumination of the nativity squished into an initial D. I love how tiny and angular the infant Christ child is!

Image source: Genève, Bibliothèque de Genève, Ms. lat. 30b, p. 13r – The Missal of Urbain Bonivard, Prior of Saint Victor in Geneva. Creative commons licensed by eCodices via Flickr.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a lovely historiated initial of the nativity from a Netherlandish manuscript we looked at a couple of weeks ago. Sorry there have been a few days without a manuscript, I was evidently a little too relaxed over my Christmas holiday!
This is our last manuscript for 2013. I hope you’ve enjoyed the ride, here’s to a manuscript-tasic 2014, with lots more beautiful illuminations to celebrate.
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 175. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a lovely historiated initial of the nativity from a Netherlandish manuscript we looked at a couple of weeks ago. Sorry there have been a few days without a manuscript, I was evidently a little too relaxed over my Christmas holiday!

This is our last manuscript for 2013. I hope you’ve enjoyed the ride, here’s to a manuscript-tasic 2014, with lots more beautiful illuminations to celebrate.

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 175. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a historiated initial depicting the nativity. The elaborate border includes images from advent including the annunciation and the shepherds. It’s a lovely page from a book of hours produced in England in the fourteenth century.
Image source: British Library MS Royal 13 D I*. Image ddeclared as public domain on the British Library website.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a historiated initial depicting the nativity. The elaborate border includes images from advent including the annunciation and the shepherds. It’s a lovely page from a book of hours produced in England in the fourteenth century.

Image source: British Library MS Royal 13 D I*. Image ddeclared as public domain on the British Library website.

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medievalpoc:

Jan Gossaert

The Adoration of the Kings

1510-15

Oil on oak

177.2 x 161.8 cm

National Gallery, London

The details on this work are just amazing. If you’re wondering what I mean, the red trim on the Black King, Balthazar’s crown, says, “GOSSAERT”.

[high resolution]

[x]

Mesmerising.

(via ash-wednesday)

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thegetty:

Happy Holidays, from a medieval illustrator to you. 

This nativity scene, complete with overly friendly barn animals licking a quick confused Christ Child, is #NowOnView in Canterbury and St. Albans: Treasures from Church and Cloister.

The Nativity in the St. Albans Psalter, 1130, Alexis Master. Tempera and gold on parchment, 12 3/16 x 8 5/8 in. Dombibliothek Hildesheim

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Pretty medieval manuscript of Christmas day shows the nativity of Christ. This lovely illuminated page from the Amherst Hours has a midwife holding the infant Christ, who has been bundled up in swaddling clothes. Joseph, portrayed as a very old man, sits fatigued by the Virgin Mary’s bed. This scene is heavily influenced by descriptions in the apocryphya, stories which would have been familiar to medieval Christians.
Merry Christmas everyone, I wish you a happy, healthy, and peaceful new year.
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 167. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of Christmas day shows the nativity of Christ. This lovely illuminated page from the Amherst Hours has a midwife holding the infant Christ, who has been bundled up in swaddling clothes. Joseph, portrayed as a very old man, sits fatigued by the Virgin Mary’s bed. This scene is heavily influenced by descriptions in the apocryphya, stories which would have been familiar to medieval Christians.

Merry Christmas everyone, I wish you a happy, healthy, and peaceful new year.

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 167. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of Christmas eve is a beautiful illumination of the annunciation to the shepherds. This leaf from the ‘Amherst hours’ is rather lovely because the action in the main illustration strays into the margins. Sleep well tonight everyone, Christmas is coming!
Image source: Walters Museum MS W.167. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of Christmas eve is a beautiful illumination of the annunciation to the shepherds. This leaf from the ‘Amherst hours’ is rather lovely because the action in the main illustration strays into the margins. Sleep well tonight everyone, Christmas is coming!

Image source: Walters Museum MS W.167. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another beautiful image of the annunciation to the shepherds. They look heavenwards to the angel overhead. Christmas is coming!
Image source: British Library MS Harley 5762. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website. 

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another beautiful image of the annunciation to the shepherds. They look heavenwards to the angel overhead. Christmas is coming!

Image source: British Library MS Harley 5762. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website. 

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts the annunciation to the shepherds. A reminder that Christmas day is not far from us now…
Image source: Bibliotheque Stanislas Nancy MS 305. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts the annunciation to the shepherds. A reminder that Christmas day is not far from us now…

Image source: Bibliotheque Stanislas Nancy MS 305. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts the annunciation to the shepherds. It is a detail from a leaf of the De Lisle psalter, one of my favourite manuscripts. I am sure we must have looked at this image before as it is so lovely, however I’ve been running this blog for so long now that it is quite tricky to keep track of which images I’ve shared before…. and this is beautiful enough that we can certainly justify revisiting it.
Image source: British Library MS 83, the De Lisle Psalter.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts the annunciation to the shepherds. It is a detail from a leaf of the De Lisle psalter, one of my favourite manuscripts. I am sure we must have looked at this image before as it is so lovely, however I’ve been running this blog for so long now that it is quite tricky to keep track of which images I’ve shared before…. and this is beautiful enough that we can certainly justify revisiting it.

Image source: British Library MS 83, the De Lisle Psalter.

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