Things I've picked up along the way...

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a leaf from the Alumgavar Hours, a rich and lavishly detailed manuscript in the collection of the Walters Museum. Quite a contrast to the books we’ve looked at lately!
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 420. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a leaf from the Alumgavar Hours, a rich and lavishly detailed manuscript in the collection of the Walters Museum. Quite a contrast to the books we’ve looked at lately!

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 420. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

58 notes

uispeccoll:

thegirlwhoisthursday:

libralthinking:

uispeccoll:

Thanks to librarian Lindsay Morecraft for supplying perfectly appropriate thumbs for this shot.

Facsimile edition of the 15th century (ca. 1460-1477), heart-shaped Chansonnier de Jean de Montchenu (Ms. Occ. Rothschild 2973) housed in the Bibliothèque nationale de France.
Polyphonic chansons for 2-4 voices.
Choir book is in the shape of a heart. Issued in leather case (23 cm.).
Contains Middle French and Italian secular pieces by or attributed to Barbingant, Fedé, Bedingham, Dufay, Dunstable, Binchois, Frye, Busnois, Caron, Cornago, Ghizeghem, Morton, Ockeghem, Vincenet and others.
One of 1380 numbered copies signed by a notary.

Rita Benton Music Rare Book Room FOLIO M2 .C428 2010
University of Iowa.



Extra thanks to Lindsay for finishing her MLS and getting hired full time so I can call her “librarian” there for the first time :)

This gives me feelings one probably shouldn’t have about books.

That is a daily job hazard in Special Collections.

Stunning! Also, congratulations and well  done on the MLIS! :)

uispeccoll:

thegirlwhoisthursday:

libralthinking:

uispeccoll:

Thanks to librarian Lindsay Morecraft for supplying perfectly appropriate thumbs for this shot.

Facsimile edition of the 15th century (ca. 1460-1477), heart-shaped Chansonnier de Jean de Montchenu (Ms. Occ. Rothschild 2973) housed in the Bibliothèque nationale de France.
Polyphonic chansons for 2-4 voices.
Choir book is in the shape of a heart. Issued in leather case (23 cm.).
Contains Middle French and Italian secular pieces by or attributed to Barbingant, Fedé, Bedingham, Dufay, Dunstable, Binchois, Frye, Busnois, Caron, Cornago, Ghizeghem, Morton, Ockeghem, Vincenet and others.
One of 1380 numbered copies signed by a notary.

Rita Benton Music Rare Book Room FOLIO M2 .C428 2010
University of Iowa.

Extra thanks to Lindsay for finishing her MLS and getting hired full time so I can call her “librarian” there for the first time :)

This gives me feelings one probably shouldn’t have about books.

That is a daily job hazard in Special Collections.

Stunning!

Also, congratulations and well done on the MLIS! :)

829 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day shows… well I’m not quite sure! Is the bishop blessing this chap’s behind? Or is he mocking the bishop? No idea, but it’s an excellent example of the drollery, a comic marginal illustration in a medieval book of hours.
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 88. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day shows… well I’m not quite sure! Is the bishop blessing this chap’s behind? Or is he mocking the bishop? No idea, but it’s an excellent example of the drollery, a comic marginal illustration in a medieval book of hours.

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 88. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr.

65 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is the binding of a fourteenth century manuscript. The leather part is not original, but the middle panel (sadly made of ivory) is, just showing how fancy some medieval books were!
Image source: British Library MS Additional 35515. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is the binding of a fourteenth century manuscript. The leather part is not original, but the middle panel (sadly made of ivory) is, just showing how fancy some medieval books were!

Image source: British Library MS Additional 35515. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

368 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another cutting, this time from the border of a sixteenth century missal produced in either Florence or Rome. This depicts Peter, Isaiah, and another prophet.
Image source: British Library MS Additional 60630. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another cutting, this time from the border of a sixteenth century missal produced in either Florence or Rome. This depicts Peter, Isaiah, and another prophet.

Image source: British Library MS Additional 60630. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

33 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another lovely illustration in grisaille, shades of grey, but highlighted with blues and gilding. Really lovely!
Image source: SCA 40. Creative Commons licensed by medievalfragments via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is another lovely illustration in grisaille, shades of grey, but highlighted with blues and gilding. Really lovely!

Image source: SCA 40. Creative Commons licensed by medievalfragments via Flickr.

1,709 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts two rabbits… one eating, and the other looking slightly envious!
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 88. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr. 

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day depicts two rabbits… one eating, and the other looking slightly envious!

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 88. Creative Commons licensed via Flickr

279 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is really rather lovely. I’ve no idea what it is, but I like it!
Image source: UBL LTK 231. Creative Commons licensed by medievalfragments via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is really rather lovely. I’ve no idea what it is, but I like it!

Image source: UBL LTK 231. Creative Commons licensed by medievalfragments via Flickr.

53 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a richly decorated leaf from the Book of Hours of the Ladies of Oudenaarde. The manuscript was produced in the low countries in the early fifteenth century.
Image source: Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 104: Book of Hours of the Ladies of Oudenaarde. Creative Commons licensed via eCodices on Flickr. 

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a richly decorated leaf from the Book of Hours of the Ladies of OudenaardeThe manuscript was produced in the low countries in the early fifteenth century.

Image source: Utopia, armarium codicum bibliophilorum, Cod. 104: Book of Hours of the Ladies of Oudenaarde. Creative Commons licensed via eCodices on Flickr

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Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a leaf from a lovely fourteenth century book of hours in the collection of the Walters Museum. I love the neat scribal hand - so precise!
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 37. Creative Commons licensed by the Walters Museum via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a leaf from a lovely fourteenth century book of hours in the collection of the Walters Museum. I love the neat scribal hand - so precise!

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 37. Creative Commons licensed by the Walters Museum via Flickr.

46 notes

erikkwakkel:

Garbage castleToday I spent the entire day going through medieval garbage. That is to say, I went though boxes filled with remains of medieval and early-modern books, which were stored in the archives of Maastricht, in the south of Holland. The snippets and sheets were thrown out centuries ago, but were subsequently fished out of the bin because a new purpose was found for them: recycling. Many ended up in the dark inside of bookbindings, where they supported boards and backs. Not the example above, however, which was used for a more artistic purpose, likely in the late 16th century: the large blank space was perfect for doodling a castle on - and two of its inhabitants. A draft, no doubt, a practice run before the real deal was undertaken. Someone liked it enough, however, to hang on to, although the sheet ultimately shared the fate of his peers - the bin. It may have been recycled again, ultimately ending up filed in a box, and then, today, in my hands. I just love this well-traveled garbage castle.Pic (my own): Maastricht, Regionaal Historisch Centrum Limburg, 18.A Nr. 208.

Great post! The accident of survival never ceases to amaze me. What we have, and what has been lost.

erikkwakkel:

Garbage castle

Today I spent the entire day going through medieval garbage. That is to say, I went though boxes filled with remains of medieval and early-modern books, which were stored in the archives of Maastricht, in the south of Holland. The snippets and sheets were thrown out centuries ago, but were subsequently fished out of the bin because a new purpose was found for them: recycling. Many ended up in the dark inside of bookbindings, where they supported boards and backs. Not the example above, however, which was used for a more artistic purpose, likely in the late 16th century: the large blank space was perfect for doodling a castle on - and two of its inhabitants. A draft, no doubt, a practice run before the real deal was undertaken. Someone liked it enough, however, to hang on to, although the sheet ultimately shared the fate of his peers - the bin. It may have been recycled again, ultimately ending up filed in a box, and then, today, in my hands. I just love this well-traveled garbage castle.

Pic (my own): Maastricht, Regionaal Historisch Centrum Limburg, 18.A Nr. 208.

Great post! The accident of survival never ceases to amaze me. What we have, and what has been lost.

507 notes

thegetty:

Ooh, some "Balancing" competition from Team France.
(Thanks Larsdatter)
From the British Library, from The Decretals of Gregory IX, 1300-1340, Page here.

thegetty:

Ooh, some "Balancing" competition from Team France.

(Thanks Larsdatter)

From the British Library, from The Decretals of Gregory IX, 1300-1340, Page here.

351 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a very pretty little border from a fifteenth century manuscript produced in Italy. It is a cutting from a manuscript which no longer survives, bar these few fragments.
Image source: British Library MS Additional 60630. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a very pretty little border from a fifteenth century manuscript produced in Italy. It is a cutting from a manuscript which no longer survives, bar these few fragments.

Image source: British Library MS Additional 60630. Image declared as public domain on the British Library website.

72 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is really rather beautiful. Simple but effective. Lovely!
Image source: UBL LTK 575. Creative Commons licensed by medievalfragments via Flickr.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is really rather beautiful. Simple but effective. Lovely!

Image source: UBL LTK 575. Creative Commons licensed by medievalfragments via Flickr.

53 notes

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is so lovely I am sure I must have posted it before! It is a leaf from another book in the collection of the Walters Museum. I like how the marginal figures are hauling the text into place! The scribe has made an error, omitting some of the text… can you imagine the sinking feeling he must have had when he realised? Books like these take some writing - hours of work on expensive vellum. However he’s managed to salvage the leaf after all, making a joke of it and having some fun with his little line drawn friend who drags the words into their rightful place. Lovely!
Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 102. Image declared as public domain on Wikimedia Commons.

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is so lovely I am sure I must have posted it before! It is a leaf from another book in the collection of the Walters Museum. I like how the marginal figures are hauling the text into place! The scribe has made an error, omitting some of the text… can you imagine the sinking feeling he must have had when he realised? Books like these take some writing - hours of work on expensive vellum. However he’s managed to salvage the leaf after all, making a joke of it and having some fun with his little line drawn friend who drags the words into their rightful place. Lovely!

Image source: Walters Museum MS W. 102. Image declared as public domain on Wikimedia Commons.

80 notes